Computational Genomics, Medicine Genomics, System Biology

Sclust paper published on NP

After years fighting, our Sclsut paper published on Nature Protocols finally. Enjoy!

Copy-number analysis and inference of subclonal populations in cancer genomes using Sclust

  • Nature Protocols volume13pages1488–1501 (2018)
  • doi:10.1038/nprot.2018.033
Published: 24 May 2018

Abstract

The genomes of cancer cells constantly change during pathogenesis. This evolutionary process can lead to the emergence of drug-resistant mutations in subclonal populations, which can hinder therapeutic intervention in patients. Data derived from massively parallel sequencing can be used to infer these subclonal populations using tumor-specific point mutations. The accurate determination of copy-number changes and tumor impurity is necessary to reliably infer subclonal populations by mutational clustering. This protocol describes how to use Sclust, a copy-number analysis method with a recently developed mutational clustering approach. In a series of simulations and comparisons with alternative methods, we have previously shown that Sclust accurately determines copy-number states and subclonal populations. Performance tests show that the method is computationally efficient, with copy-number analysis and mutational clustering taking <10 min. Sclust is designed such that even non-experts in computational biology or bioinformatics with basic knowledge of the Linux/Unix command-line syntax should be able to carry out analyses of subclonal populations.

Computational Genomics, Medicine Genomics

A new fast method for copy number calling, tissue purity estimating and subclone inferring in cancer genome

Our new methods final launched on Nature Protocols, where we developed a series of methods and related C++/R combined software package,  Sclust(around 1.5Gb,大文件谨慎载). In Sclust, you can do copy number calling, cancer tissue purity estimating and clone and subclone structure inferring from normal-tumor paired whole genome/exon sequencing data.

先总结一下,我们方法的有如下点:

1. 可以准确地做copy number calling, tumor purity estimating,subclonal inferring;

2. subclonal inferring的速度超级快。4000~6000 个SNVs 的 clonal inferring 过程在个人电脑上只需3到5秒。

3. sclust 给出了每个集群的倍数树变异,目前还有少数个软件提供这个功能。

欢迎使用软件,欢迎咨询,欢迎交流。

联系邮件:yp.cun@outlook.com。 下面clonal 推断一些背景。

Continue reading “A new fast method for copy number calling, tissue purity estimating and subclone inferring in cancer genome”

Computational Genomics, Medicine Genomics, System Biology

A useful course of biomedical data analysis

Biomedical Data Science: http://genomicsclass.github.io/book/

Chapter 0 – Introduction

Chapter 1 – Inference

Chapter 2 – Exploratory Data Analysis

Chapter 3 – Robust Statistics

Chapter 4 – Matrix Algebra

Chapter 5 – Linear Models

Chapter 6 – Inference for High-Dimensional Data

Chapter 7 – Statistical Modeling

Chapter 8 – Distance and Dimension Reduction

Chapter 9 – Practical Machine Learning

Chapter 10 – Batch Effects


525.5x: Introduction to Bioconductor: Annotation and analysis

Setup and basics on biological background (Week 1)

Focus on data structure and management (Week 2)

Focus on genomic ranges (Week 3a)

Focus on genomic annotation (Week 3b)

Testing genome-scale hypotheses (Week 4)

525.6x: High-performance computing for reproducible genomics with Bioconductor

Visualization of genome scale data (Week 1)

Scalable genomic analysis (Week 2)

Multi-omic data integration (Week 3)

Fostering reproducible genome-scale analysis (Week 4)


Legacy material from 2015 Introduction to Bioconductor

RNA-seq data analysis

Variant Discovery and Genotyping

ChIP-seq data analysis

DNA methylation data analysis


Footnotes for all lectures

Acknowledgments

Continue reading “A useful course of biomedical data analysis”

Computational Genomics, Machine Learning, Medicine Genomics, Programming, R

A new R package for network-based biomarker discovery released

A new R package, netClass, has been release. netClass integrate network information, such as protein-protein interaction network or KEGG, to mRNA classification, but also incorporate miRNA to mRNA with mi-mRNA interaction network for biomarker discovery. This methods we called stSVM and already published in PloS ONE (Cun et al 2013). Apart from stSVM, we also implement the flowing methods in netClass: 

  1. AEP (average gene expression of pathway), Guo et al., BMC Bioinformatics 2005, 6:58.
  2. PAC (pathway activitive classification), Lee E, et  al., PLoS Comput Biol 4(11): e1000217.
  3. hubc (Hub nodes classification), Taylor et al.(2009) Nat. Biotech.: doi: 10.1038/nbt.152
  4. frSVM (filter via top ranked genes), Cun et al. arXiv:1212.3214 ;  Winter etal., PLoS Comput Biol 8(5): e1002511.
  5. stSVM (network smoothed t-statistic) , Cun et al., PloS One,.

NetClass can be download from souceforg ( http://sourceforge.net/projects/netclassr/) or , CRAN (http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/netClass/ ). For more detail of netClass, you can refer these four papers:

Computational Genomics, Medicine Genomics, System Biology

“Translational Bioinformatics” collection for PLOS cBio

A review collection in current approach in Translational Bioinformatics.

=======================================================

COVER
Image Credit: PLOS
Issue Image

‘Translational Bioinformatics’ is a collection of PLOS Computational Biology Education articles which reads as a “book” to be used as a reference or tutorial for a graduate level introductory course on the science of translational bioinformatics.

Translational bioinformatics is an emerging field that addresses the current challenges of integrating increasingly voluminous amounts of molecular and clinical data. Its aim is to provide a better understanding of the molecular basis of disease, which in turn will inform clinical practice and ultimately improve human health.

The concept of a translational bioinformatics introductory book was originally conceived in 2009 by Jake Chen and Maricel Kann. Each chapter was crafted by leading experts who provide a solid introduction to the topics covered, complete with training exercises and answers. The rapid evolution of this field is expected to lead to updates and new chapters that will be incorporated into this collection.

Collection editors: Maricel Kann, Guest Editor, and Fran Lewitter, PLOS Computational Biology Education Editor.

Download the full Translational Bioinformatics collection here: PDF

Collection URL: www.ploscollections.org/translationalbioinformatics

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002796

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002826

Chapter 2: Data-Driven View of Disease Biology

Casey S. Greene, Olga G. Troyanskaya

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002816

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002805

Chapter 4: Protein Interactions and Disease

Mileidy W. Gonzalez, Maricel G. Kann

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002819

Chapter 5: Network Biology Approach to Complex Diseases

Dong-Yeon Cho, Yoo-Ah Kim, Teresa M. Przytycka

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002820

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002821

Chapter 7: Pharmacogenomics

Konrad J. Karczewski, Roxana Daneshjou, Russ B. Altman

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002817

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002858

Chapter 9: Analyses Using Disease Ontologies

Nigam H. Shah, Tyler Cole, Mark A. Musen

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002827

Chapter 10: Mining Genome-Wide Genetic Markers

Xiang Zhang, Shunping Huang, Zhaojun Zhang, Wei Wang

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002828

Chapter 11: Genome-Wide Association Studies

William S. Bush, Jason H. Moore

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002822

Chapter 12: Human Microbiome Analysis

Xochitl C. Morgan, Curtis Huttenhower

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002808

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002823

Chapter 14: Cancer Genome Analysis

Miguel Vazquez, Victor de la Torre, Alfonso Valencia

PLOS Computational Biology: published 27 Dec 2012 | info:doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002824

 

Computational Genomics, Machine Learning, Medicine Genomics

Use prior information to prognostic biomaker or not?

In our recent publication in BMC bioinformatics, we acompared a great deal of feature selection methods to finding prognostic biomakers in 6 breast cancer gene expresion data. No methods show significant performacne in prediction accuracy, feature selection stability and  biogical interprety, which against previeous reseach results: current network-based appraoch did not show much benift in our analysis. Meanwhile, A group from NKI also show the simliar results in PloS One. The R codes for these algorithms in our paper is availiable as request.

Prediction performance in terms of area under ROC curve (AUC)

Continue reading “Use prior information to prognostic biomaker or not?”

Computational Genomics, Machine Learning, Medicine Genomics

Current approach in finding biomaker by means of mahcine learning

How to find the robust biomarkers in the genomics data are first step to personalized medicine. Here we take a short review on how machine leaning works in find biomarkers and current aproach in this area.  for more interesting technology, please see the following papers.

Biomarker Gene Signature Discovery Integrating Network Knowledge

Bonn-Aachen International Center for IT (B-IT), Dahlmannstr. 2, 53113 Bonn, Germany
Abstract: Discovery of prognostic and diagnostic biomarker gene signatures for diseases, such as cancer, is seen as a major step towards a better personalized medicine. During the last decade various methods, mainly coming from the machine learning or statistical domain, have been proposed for that purpose. However, one important obstacle for making gene signatures a standard tool in clinical diagnosis is the typical low reproducibility of these signatures combined with the difficulty to achieve a clear biological interpretation. For that purpose in the last years there has been a growing interest in approaches that try to integrate information from molecular interaction networks. Here we review the current state of research in this field by giving an overview about so-far proposed approaches.